Return

Note from Barbara: When we are helping to normalize the area of Chernobyl, let us think of the last sentence below: "...how one thinks is how it is, and so, if one can conceive of the perfect, then that is how it will become."

 

A Spring in Chernobyl

 

 A Japanese movie director, Seiichi Motohashi, has made a film called “Alexis and a Spring”, which focuses on life in a small village called Bzyshtsche in southeast Belarus, located within the Chernoybl disaster area. After the nuclear accident in 1986, the entire village population of 600 fled, with the exception of a few old people and a youth called Alexis. The village rests in a tranquil, beautiful area of Nature, and its inhabitants pursue their rural lives peacefully, as if there had never been a disaster in that area.

A spring has water surprisingly free of radioactivity, even though no one has decontaminated the water. It is as if Nature has cured herself, or retained her health. While making the film, Director Motohashi asked an old woman why she had not fled the area, and she answered, "I can live only with this water." A number of people who saw the film said they felt strong healing energy coming from the spring.

In an interview, a Japanese cameraman who made the film said that normally when one thinks of Chernobyl, thoughts of disaster are uppermost, and there is an urge to help relieve the sufferings of the people. But when he arrived in Bzyshtsche and he saw the people peacefully pursuing their lives as if nothing had happened, and that Nature appeared beautiful and untouched, he decided to film the area as he saw it -- peaceful, perfect. He concluded that how one thinks is how it is, and so, if one can conceive of the perfect, then that is how it will become.